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Ecological dynamics / Christopher J. Paradise, A. Malcolm Campbell.

By: Paradise, Christopher J [author.].
Contributor(s): Campbell, A. Malcolm [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Biology collection: Publisher: New York, [New York] (222 East 46th Street, New York, NY 10017) : Momentum Press, 2016Description: 1 online resource (48 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781606509586.Call number: 577 Subject(s): Ecology | Environmental sciences | Unicellular organisms | Soil microbial ecology | Marine ecology | Marine phytoplankton -- Environmental aspects | Red tide | Algal blooms | organism | dynamics | populations | ecological systems | paralytic shellfish poisoning | microbes | doubling time | growth rate | exponential growth | carrying capacity | logistic growth | protists | nitrogen fixation | nitrogen cycle | assimilation | decomposition | nitrification | denitrification | algal bloom | red tide | phytoplankton | harmful algal bloom | iron hypothesis | zooplankton | ocean fertilizationOnline resources: Click here to access online Also available in print.
Contents:
1. Populations of unicellular organisms can increase over time --
2. Soil microbes are involved in nutrient cycling -- Ethical, legal, social implications: there are positive and negative consequences of agricultural practices on soil ecosystems --
3. Certain phytoplankton can produce a red tide -- Ethical, legal, social implications: seeding the oceans with iron to increase productivity and create a carbon sink has consequences -- Index.
Abstract: Population growth, dynamics, and blooms of bacterial, unicellular eukaryotes, and toxic algae are described in this book. Microbes are used to illustrate both exponential and logistic population growth. Microbes are also used to illustrate dynamics in other aspects of ecological systems, including nutrient cycling. The movement of nitrogen in ecological systems is largely affected by microbes, some of which have symbiotic relationships with legumes. The effects of the environment on the growth of microbes and the effects of the microbes on ecological systems are described in reference to nutrient cycles and harmful algal blooms. Populations of harmful algal can quickly grow and exceed carrying capacity, with resulting negative effects on other species, including humans.
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ebook

Includes bibliographical references and index.

1. Populations of unicellular organisms can increase over time --

2. Soil microbes are involved in nutrient cycling -- Ethical, legal, social implications: there are positive and negative consequences of agricultural practices on soil ecosystems --

3. Certain phytoplankton can produce a red tide -- Ethical, legal, social implications: seeding the oceans with iron to increase productivity and create a carbon sink has consequences -- Index.

Restricted to libraries which purchase an unrestricted PDF download via an IP.

Population growth, dynamics, and blooms of bacterial, unicellular eukaryotes, and toxic algae are described in this book. Microbes are used to illustrate both exponential and logistic population growth. Microbes are also used to illustrate dynamics in other aspects of ecological systems, including nutrient cycling. The movement of nitrogen in ecological systems is largely affected by microbes, some of which have symbiotic relationships with legumes. The effects of the environment on the growth of microbes and the effects of the microbes on ecological systems are described in reference to nutrient cycles and harmful algal blooms. Populations of harmful algal can quickly grow and exceed carrying capacity, with resulting negative effects on other species, including humans.

Also available in print.

Mode of access: World Wide Web.

System requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.

Title from PDF title page (viewed on April 9, 2016).

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