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Cellular respiration / A. Malcolm Campbell, Christopher J. Paradise.

By: Campbell, A. Malcolm [author.].
Contributor(s): Paradise, Christopher J [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Biology collection: Publisher: New York, [New York] (222 East 46th Street, New York, NY 10017) : Momentum Press, 2016Description: 1 online resource (66 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781606509982.Call number: 572.47 Subject(s): Cell respiration | Cell metabolism | first law of thermodynamics | second law of thermodynamics | entropy | free energy | reduced | oxidized | homeostasis | palmitic acid | casein | lactose | enzymes | redox | cofactors | coenzymes | beta oxidation | acetyl CoA | mitrochondrial matrix | cellular respiration | limiting factor | deamination | allosterically modulated | phosphofructokinase | citrate | negative feedback loop | mitochondrial matrix | chemiosmosis | ATP synthaseOnline resources: Click here to access online Also available in print.
Contents:
1. Molecules carry energy in their covalent bonds --
2. Converting common foods into energy -- Lipid metabolism -- Protein metabolism -- Carbohydrate metabolism -- Ethical, legal, social implications: memorizing details obscures learning --
3. Energy extraction from 2-carbon intermediates --
4. ATP production from digested foods -- Overview of energy homeostasis -- Ethical, legal, social implications: the importance of eating vegetables -- Conclusion -- Glossary -- Index.
Abstract: What happens to a meal after it is eaten? Food consists primarily of lipids, proteins and carbohydrates (sugars). How do cells in the body process food once it is eaten and turned it into a form of energy that other cells can use? This book examines some of the classic experimental data that revealed how cells break down food to extract the energy. Metabolism of food is regulated so that energy extraction increases when needed and slows down when not needed. This type of self-regulation is all part of the complex web of enzymes that convert food into energy. Adding to this complexity is that all food eventually winds up as two carbon bits that are all processed the same way. This book will also reveal why animals breathe oxygen and how that relates to the end of the energy extraction process and oxygen's only role in the body. Rather than look at all the details, this book takes a wider view and shows how cellular respiration is self-regulating.
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ebook

Includes bibliographical references and index.

1. Molecules carry energy in their covalent bonds --

2. Converting common foods into energy -- Lipid metabolism -- Protein metabolism -- Carbohydrate metabolism -- Ethical, legal, social implications: memorizing details obscures learning --

3. Energy extraction from 2-carbon intermediates --

4. ATP production from digested foods -- Overview of energy homeostasis -- Ethical, legal, social implications: the importance of eating vegetables -- Conclusion -- Glossary -- Index.

Restricted to libraries which purchase an unrestricted PDF download via an IP.

What happens to a meal after it is eaten? Food consists primarily of lipids, proteins and carbohydrates (sugars). How do cells in the body process food once it is eaten and turned it into a form of energy that other cells can use? This book examines some of the classic experimental data that revealed how cells break down food to extract the energy. Metabolism of food is regulated so that energy extraction increases when needed and slows down when not needed. This type of self-regulation is all part of the complex web of enzymes that convert food into energy. Adding to this complexity is that all food eventually winds up as two carbon bits that are all processed the same way. This book will also reveal why animals breathe oxygen and how that relates to the end of the energy extraction process and oxygen's only role in the body. Rather than look at all the details, this book takes a wider view and shows how cellular respiration is self-regulating.

Also available in print.

Mode of access: World Wide Web.

System requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.

Title from PDF title page (viewed on April 10, 2016).

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