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The source of genetic information / A. Malcolm Campbell, Christopher J. Paradise.

By: Campbell, A. Malcolm [author.].
Contributor(s): Paradise, Christopher J [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Biology collection: Publisher: New York, [New York] (222 East 46th Street, New York, NY 10017) : Momentum Press, 2016Description: 1 online resource (44 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781944749163.Call number: 572.86 Subject(s): DNA | Genetics | heritable material | emergent property | R colonies | S colonies | S factor | DNA structure | nucleotides | deoxyribose | dNTP | purines | pyrimidines | hydrogen bonds | covalent bonds | non-radioactive isotopes | semiconservative replication | methylated DNA | thin layer chromatography | hypomethylated | hypermethylated | epigenetic | methyltransferaseOnline resources: Click here to access online Also available in print.
Contents:
1. Defining biological information --
2. Search for the heritable information --
3. Disproving proteins are the heritable information -- Ethical, legal, social implications: DNA ownership --
4. DNA structure determines its function -- The structure of DNA -- DNA replication --
5. Not all DNA information is linear in nature --
Conclusion -- Glossary -- Index.
Abstract: Everyone who has taken any biology class knows that DNA is the heritable material. However, very few people know the evidence that led to this conclusion. Science is a discipline based on evidence not acceptance based on faith in a teacher or other authority. This book presents the historical and scientific context to understand how we know DNA is the heritable material. Furthermore, how the structure of DNA reveals its function will be discussed. The famous double helix shape foretold how it would be replicated. Two biochemists conducted the research to confirm that each of the two strands serve as template for new DNA synthesis. Despite its central role in cell function, the order of bases in DNA is not the full story. This book also introduces the topic of epigenetics by presenting the first animal experiments that showed epigenetic changes can lead to a change in phenotype even though the DNA is not mutated.
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ebook

Includes bibliographical references and index.

1. Defining biological information --

2. Search for the heritable information --

3. Disproving proteins are the heritable information -- Ethical, legal, social implications: DNA ownership --

4. DNA structure determines its function -- The structure of DNA -- DNA replication --

5. Not all DNA information is linear in nature --

Conclusion -- Glossary -- Index.

Restricted to libraries which purchase an unrestricted PDF download via an IP.

Everyone who has taken any biology class knows that DNA is the heritable material. However, very few people know the evidence that led to this conclusion. Science is a discipline based on evidence not acceptance based on faith in a teacher or other authority. This book presents the historical and scientific context to understand how we know DNA is the heritable material. Furthermore, how the structure of DNA reveals its function will be discussed. The famous double helix shape foretold how it would be replicated. Two biochemists conducted the research to confirm that each of the two strands serve as template for new DNA synthesis. Despite its central role in cell function, the order of bases in DNA is not the full story. This book also introduces the topic of epigenetics by presenting the first animal experiments that showed epigenetic changes can lead to a change in phenotype even though the DNA is not mutated.

Also available in print.

Mode of access: World Wide Web.

System requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.

Title from PDF title page (viewed on May 14, 2016).

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