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Ecological interactions / Christopher J. Paradise, A. Malcolm Campbell.

By: Paradise, Christopher J [author.].
Contributor(s): Campbell, A. Malcolm [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Biology collection: Publisher: New York, [New York] (222 East 46th Street, New York, NY 10017) : Momentum Press, 2016Description: 1 online resource (54 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781606509562.Call number: 574.5 Subject(s): Ecology | Wolves -- Reintroduction -- Yellowstone National Park | Food chains (Ecology) | carnivores | food webs | energy flows | energy | nutrients | resources | population | competition | cooperation | trade-off | consumption | resource use overlap | competitive exclusion principle | environmental gradients | competitive ability | limiting resource | ecological system | homeostasis | primary production | trophic level | trophic pyramids | primary consumer | herbivore | secondary consumers | primary consumers | respiration | assimilationOnline resources: Click here to access online Also available in print.
Contents:
1. Vegetation diversity increased when wolves were reintroduced into Yellowstone National Park -- Ethical, legal, social implications: there are arguments for and against species reintroductions --
2. The outcome of competition for a resource often depends upon environmental conditions --
3. Energy flows through food webs --
4. Ecological systems are not very efficient at transferring energy from the sun and carbon dioxide from the air to predators --
Conclusion -- Glossary -- Index.
Abstract: Food webs, energy flow, indirect effects, and nutrient cycling are described as properties that emerge in ecological systems. Several of these properties are shown in this book to result from indirect effects and interactions between species and abiotic components of ecological systems. For instance, top predators affect organisms with which they do not directly interact, including plants and non-prey animals. In some other interactions, including competition, the nonliving components of ecological systems (the abiota) can alter the outcome of a biotic interaction. A limiting resource often results in competition, but varying environmental conditions allow for species coexistence. Finally, this book illustrates how energy flows in ecological systems, why it is rather inefficient, and how species interactions relate to homeostasis and emergent properties. In the course of that discussion, primary production, secondary production, and trophic levels are defined. Energy flow in ecological systems is tied to the carbon cycle.
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ebook

Includes bibliographical references and index.

1. Vegetation diversity increased when wolves were reintroduced into Yellowstone National Park -- Ethical, legal, social implications: there are arguments for and against species reintroductions --

2. The outcome of competition for a resource often depends upon environmental conditions --

3. Energy flows through food webs --

4. Ecological systems are not very efficient at transferring energy from the sun and carbon dioxide from the air to predators --

Conclusion -- Glossary -- Index.

Restricted to libraries which purchase an unrestricted PDF download via an IP.

Food webs, energy flow, indirect effects, and nutrient cycling are described as properties that emerge in ecological systems. Several of these properties are shown in this book to result from indirect effects and interactions between species and abiotic components of ecological systems. For instance, top predators affect organisms with which they do not directly interact, including plants and non-prey animals. In some other interactions, including competition, the nonliving components of ecological systems (the abiota) can alter the outcome of a biotic interaction. A limiting resource often results in competition, but varying environmental conditions allow for species coexistence. Finally, this book illustrates how energy flows in ecological systems, why it is rather inefficient, and how species interactions relate to homeostasis and emergent properties. In the course of that discussion, primary production, secondary production, and trophic levels are defined. Energy flow in ecological systems is tied to the carbon cycle.

Also available in print.

Mode of access: World Wide Web.

System requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.

Title from PDF title page (viewed on May 14, 2016).

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