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Emergent properties of individual organisms / Christopher J. Paradise, A. Malcolm Campbell.

By: Paradise, Christopher J [author.].
Contributor(s): Campbell, A. Malcolm [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Biology collection: Publisher: New York, [New York] (222 East 46th Street, New York, NY 10017) : Momentum Press, 2016Description: 1 online resource (48 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781606509647.Call number: 574 Subject(s): Organisms | Behavior genetics | Individuation (Philosophy) | fungus | superorganism | behaviors | natural selection | fight-or-flight | division of labor | dominance hierarchy | subordinate | fear | anger | individual | colony | physiological response | endocrine system | nervous system | cooperation | mutual benefitOnline resources: Click here to access online Also available in print.
Contents:
1. The definition of the individual can be stretched beyond the classic definition --
2. The nervous and endocrine systems are the sources of emotions -- Ethical, legal, social implications: there are issues with using prescription drugs to normalize behavior in children --
3. Individuals of some species cooperate with each other for mutual benefit --
Conclusion -- Glossary -- Index.
Abstract: This book begins by describing what an individual organism is, comparing preconceptions of the individual to non-standard ways of thinking about individuals. Variation in what individuals are is described, using giant fungi, clonal trees and honey bee hives as examples. Individuals are thus shown to be emergent properties. Other emergent properties of individuals are also described. Classic experiments that elucidated the source of emotions in humans and other mammals are described. Emotions arise from the actions of the nervous and endocrine system and often include a variety of signals given to other individuals of the same or different species. In particular, this book focuses on fear and anger, two emotions that are closely related and often confused, but that have been well studied. In one final example of emergent properties of individuals, cooperative behavior is analyzed. The behaviors displayed by individuals that facilitate cooperation among individuals and why those individuals may actually cooperate instead of compete when acquiring resources or defending against predators are discussed.
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ebook

Includes bibliographical references and index.

1. The definition of the individual can be stretched beyond the classic definition --

2. The nervous and endocrine systems are the sources of emotions -- Ethical, legal, social implications: there are issues with using prescription drugs to normalize behavior in children --

3. Individuals of some species cooperate with each other for mutual benefit --

Conclusion -- Glossary -- Index.

Restricted to libraries which purchase an unrestricted PDF download via an IP.

This book begins by describing what an individual organism is, comparing preconceptions of the individual to non-standard ways of thinking about individuals. Variation in what individuals are is described, using giant fungi, clonal trees and honey bee hives as examples. Individuals are thus shown to be emergent properties. Other emergent properties of individuals are also described. Classic experiments that elucidated the source of emotions in humans and other mammals are described. Emotions arise from the actions of the nervous and endocrine system and often include a variety of signals given to other individuals of the same or different species. In particular, this book focuses on fear and anger, two emotions that are closely related and often confused, but that have been well studied. In one final example of emergent properties of individuals, cooperative behavior is analyzed. The behaviors displayed by individuals that facilitate cooperation among individuals and why those individuals may actually cooperate instead of compete when acquiring resources or defending against predators are discussed.

Also available in print.

Mode of access: World Wide Web.

System requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.

Title from PDF title page (viewed on May 14, 2016).

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