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Evolutionary history / Christopher J. Paradise, A. Malcolm Campbell.

By: Paradise, Christopher J [author.].
Contributor(s): Campbell, A. Malcolm [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Biology collection: Publisher: New York, [New York] (222 East 46th Street, New York, NY 10017) : Momentum Press, 2016Description: 1 online resource (65 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781606509661.Call number: 575 Subject(s): Evolution (Biology) | Plants -- Evolution | Human evolution | species | extinction | evolution | population | speciation | adaptive radiations | natural selection | ancestors | common ancestor | lineage | descendants | evolutionary tree | phenotype | hominids | radioisotope dating | relative dating | population genetics | heterozygous | antibiotic resistance | homozygous | pesticide resistance | adaptationOnline resources: Click here to access online Also available in print.
Contents:
1. Descent with modification and adaptive radiations can be observed -- Adaptive radiation of orchids from a common ancestor -- Rapid diversification in bats --
2. Terrestrial plants evolved from aquatic ancestors millions of years ago --
3. Humans evolved from hominid ancestors in Africa -- Ethical, legal, social implications: eugenics yesterday and today -- Ethical, legal, social implications: evolution has not reached its peak; humans are still evolving --
4. Evolution can occur quickly in response to strong selection -- Ethical, legal, social implications: overuse of chemicals like pesticides and antibiotics can have detrimental effects --
Conclusion -- Glossary -- Index.
Abstract: This book describes how evolutionary history is studied using several well-known examples and also using evolutionary trees. Evolutionary trees are analyzed and used to explain adaptive radiations of orchids and the diversification of bats over geologic time. Evolutionary trees and genetic evidence is used to infer when and from what ancestors terrestrial plants evolved and invaded land. Specific adaptations of early land plants led to the evolution of terrestrial plants and their success on land. Evidence about the ancestors and habitats of humans is used to infer and analyze the evolution of the human family tree, whose populations were subject to the same forces of evolution to which other species are subject. Human evolution was not linear, involved offshoot species that did not survive, and took many thousands of years. In contrast, evolution can be seen in just a few years or less in other examples, and analysis of the evolution of mechanisms of pesticide resistance in insects will be used to illustrate this rapid evolution.
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

1. Descent with modification and adaptive radiations can be observed -- Adaptive radiation of orchids from a common ancestor -- Rapid diversification in bats --

2. Terrestrial plants evolved from aquatic ancestors millions of years ago --

3. Humans evolved from hominid ancestors in Africa -- Ethical, legal, social implications: eugenics yesterday and today -- Ethical, legal, social implications: evolution has not reached its peak; humans are still evolving --

4. Evolution can occur quickly in response to strong selection -- Ethical, legal, social implications: overuse of chemicals like pesticides and antibiotics can have detrimental effects --

Conclusion -- Glossary -- Index.

Restricted to libraries which purchase an unrestricted PDF download via an IP.

This book describes how evolutionary history is studied using several well-known examples and also using evolutionary trees. Evolutionary trees are analyzed and used to explain adaptive radiations of orchids and the diversification of bats over geologic time. Evolutionary trees and genetic evidence is used to infer when and from what ancestors terrestrial plants evolved and invaded land. Specific adaptations of early land plants led to the evolution of terrestrial plants and their success on land. Evidence about the ancestors and habitats of humans is used to infer and analyze the evolution of the human family tree, whose populations were subject to the same forces of evolution to which other species are subject. Human evolution was not linear, involved offshoot species that did not survive, and took many thousands of years. In contrast, evolution can be seen in just a few years or less in other examples, and analysis of the evolution of mechanisms of pesticide resistance in insects will be used to illustrate this rapid evolution.

Also available in print.

Mode of access: World Wide Web.

System requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.

Title from PDF title page (viewed on May 14, 2016).

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