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Evolution of interactions in communities / Christopher J. Paradise, A. Malcolm Campbell.

By: Paradise, Christopher J [author.].
Contributor(s): Campbell, A. Malcolm [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Biology collection: Publisher: New York, [New York] (222 East 46th Street, New York, NY 10017) : Momentum Press, 2016Description: 1 online resource (50 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781606509685.Call number: 577 Subject(s): Biotic communities | Ecology | Genotype-environment interaction | ecological systems | habitats | communities | interactions | adaptive evolution | nonadaptive evolution | natural selection | predators | prey | coevolution | pairwise coevolution | diffuse coevolution | natural enemy | carnivores | herbivores | parasites | selective agents | mutualism | pollination | endosymbionts | pathogens | coral reef | intraspecific competition | disturbance | interspecific competition | species distribution | fire ecologyOnline resources: Click here to access online Also available in print.
Contents:
1. Species have evolved as a consequence of their interactions with other species -- Coevolutionary mutualism -- A predator-prey arms race -- Diffuse coevolution --
2. Corals are bleaching around the world --
3. The amount of light affects the distribution of photosynthesizing organisms --
4. Organisms in ecological communities have adapted to disturbance -- Organisms can adapt to fire -- Organisms on rocky shores are adapted to regular disturbance -- Ethical, legal, social implications: policy can be used to help prevent forest fires --
Conclusion -- Glossary -- Index.
Abstract: Pairwise and diffuse coevolution are defined, with examples that include mutualisms and predator-prey interactions. In any example of coevolution, the costs and benefits to both species involved in the interaction must be assessed in order to understand evolution of the interaction. Models to explain coral bleaching are examined in the context of a coevolutionary mutualism, as are the implications for the possible extinction of coral reefs. Data are examined in order to determine which model is best supported. Other examples of how evolution affects interactions and communities of organisms include adaptation to living in particular habitats and evolution to frequent and somewhat predictable disturbances. For the former, physiological adaptations possessed by some plants to live in low light conditions are described and assessed. Ecological disturbances are defined, and the role of disturbance on evolution of ecological systems is assessed through the use of data. Finally, how time and spatial scales affect disturbances and the evolutionary responses of organisms to disturbances are also examined.
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ebook

Includes bibliographical references and index.

1. Species have evolved as a consequence of their interactions with other species -- Coevolutionary mutualism -- A predator-prey arms race -- Diffuse coevolution --

2. Corals are bleaching around the world --

3. The amount of light affects the distribution of photosynthesizing organisms --

4. Organisms in ecological communities have adapted to disturbance -- Organisms can adapt to fire -- Organisms on rocky shores are adapted to regular disturbance -- Ethical, legal, social implications: policy can be used to help prevent forest fires --

Conclusion -- Glossary -- Index.

Restricted to libraries which purchase an unrestricted PDF download via an IP.

Pairwise and diffuse coevolution are defined, with examples that include mutualisms and predator-prey interactions. In any example of coevolution, the costs and benefits to both species involved in the interaction must be assessed in order to understand evolution of the interaction. Models to explain coral bleaching are examined in the context of a coevolutionary mutualism, as are the implications for the possible extinction of coral reefs. Data are examined in order to determine which model is best supported. Other examples of how evolution affects interactions and communities of organisms include adaptation to living in particular habitats and evolution to frequent and somewhat predictable disturbances. For the former, physiological adaptations possessed by some plants to live in low light conditions are described and assessed. Ecological disturbances are defined, and the role of disturbance on evolution of ecological systems is assessed through the use of data. Finally, how time and spatial scales affect disturbances and the evolutionary responses of organisms to disturbances are also examined.

Also available in print.

Mode of access: World Wide Web.

System requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.

Title from PDF title page (viewed on May 14, 2016).

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