Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Population homeostasis / Christopher J. Paradise, A. Malcolm Campbell.

By: Paradise, Christopher J [author.].
Contributor(s): Campbell, A. Malcolm [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Biology collection: Publisher: New York, [New York] (222 East 46th Street, New York, NY 10017) : Momentum Press, 2016Description: 1 online resource (42 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781606509760.Call number: 591.788 Subject(s): Animal populations -- Environmental aspects | Population -- Environmental aspects | Population biology | Feedback control systems | predator | energy budget | populations | homeostasis | feedback mechanism | camouflage | mortality | density-independent | pollutant | biomagnification | density-dependent | predation | evolution | natural selection | birth rate | death rate | density | dispersionOnline resources: Click here to access online Also available in print.
Contents:
1. Death of a single individual affects a population -- Ethical, legal, social implications: saving individuals may not help to save an entire population --
2. Populations are regulated through feedback mechanisms --
3. Biomagnification of DDT affects raptor populations --
Conclusion -- Glossary -- Index.
Abstract: This book will synthesize the concepts of selection against individuals in response to environmental change to illustrate how selection against individuals results in homeostasis at the population level. For instance, selection against the light phenotype of the peppered moth during the early part of the industrial revolution led to an increase of the dark phenotype, which was better camouflaged against the soot that accumulated on tree bark as a result of burning coal. Populations are shown to be regulated by feedback mechanisms, several of which are discussed here. Populations are regulated by extrinsic factors, such as competition and predation, and that lead to changes in intrinsic factors, such as reproduction. Changes in population density often lead to initiation of feedback mechanisms, such as changes in birth or death rates. In a final example, pollutants are shown to be a factor that can disrupt homeostasis of populations. In particular, populations of top predators, such as raptors, have suffered due to biomagnification of toxins.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
No physical items for this record

ebook

Includes bibliographical references and index.

1. Death of a single individual affects a population -- Ethical, legal, social implications: saving individuals may not help to save an entire population --

2. Populations are regulated through feedback mechanisms --

3. Biomagnification of DDT affects raptor populations --

Conclusion -- Glossary -- Index.

Restricted to libraries which purchase an unrestricted PDF download via an IP.

This book will synthesize the concepts of selection against individuals in response to environmental change to illustrate how selection against individuals results in homeostasis at the population level. For instance, selection against the light phenotype of the peppered moth during the early part of the industrial revolution led to an increase of the dark phenotype, which was better camouflaged against the soot that accumulated on tree bark as a result of burning coal. Populations are shown to be regulated by feedback mechanisms, several of which are discussed here. Populations are regulated by extrinsic factors, such as competition and predation, and that lead to changes in intrinsic factors, such as reproduction. Changes in population density often lead to initiation of feedback mechanisms, such as changes in birth or death rates. In a final example, pollutants are shown to be a factor that can disrupt homeostasis of populations. In particular, populations of top predators, such as raptors, have suffered due to biomagnification of toxins.

Also available in print.

Mode of access: World Wide Web.

System requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.

Title from PDF title page (viewed on May 14, 2016).

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.