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Animal physiology / A. Malcolm Campbell, Christopher J. Paradise.

By: Campbell, A. Malcolm [author.].
Contributor(s): Paradise, Christopher J [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Biology collection: Publisher: New York, [New York] (222 East 46th Street, New York, NY 10017) : Momentum Press, 2016Description: 1 online resource (72 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781606509869.Call number: 612 Subject(s): Physiology | allografts | antagonistic pleiotropy | autograft | cerebrospinal fluid | choroid plexus | circadian | disposable soma hypothesis | dopamine | eclampsia | emergent property | endometrium | eusocial | first-set rejection | graft | homeostasis | leptin | lipostat | melatonin | MHC I | natural killer | negative feedback loop | orthologs | pair-fed | parabiotic | placenta | positive feedback loop | preeclampsia | second-set rejection | senescence | suprachiasmatic nucleus | trophoblastOnline resources: Click here to access online Also available in print.
Contents:
1. Mammals have cellular clock mechanism -- Ethical, legal, social implications: sleep is connected to daily rhythms --
2. Maternal immune system tolerates non-self fetus --
3. Maintaining body weight and fat levels -- Ethical, legal, social implications: challenges of the obesity epidemic --
4. Animals age and die at different rates -- Ethical, legal, social implications: end of life issues --
Conclusions -- Glossary -- Index.
Abstract: This book examines four examples of animal physiology that illustrate emergent properties in whole organisms. The first example shows how mammals coordinate the activity of all their cells using a daily rhythm. The second case explains an apparent contradiction that happens every time a woman gets pregnant and delivers a healthy baby--how the immune system tolerates a foreign tissue such as the fetus. The next case study in this book shows how bodies regulate the amount of fat using a complex interaction of proteins that function as a lipostat, a self-regulating fat maintenance system. Finally, the book provides an understanding of why some species live long lives while others die after very short lives, and under what conditions each situation is favored. What is evolutionarily adaptive about death? These four case studies provide sufficient evidence to understand how animals regulate many of their own metabolic functions.
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ebook

Includes bibliographical references and index.

1. Mammals have cellular clock mechanism -- Ethical, legal, social implications: sleep is connected to daily rhythms --

2. Maternal immune system tolerates non-self fetus --

3. Maintaining body weight and fat levels -- Ethical, legal, social implications: challenges of the obesity epidemic --

4. Animals age and die at different rates -- Ethical, legal, social implications: end of life issues --

Conclusions -- Glossary -- Index.

Restricted to libraries which purchase an unrestricted PDF download via an IP.

This book examines four examples of animal physiology that illustrate emergent properties in whole organisms. The first example shows how mammals coordinate the activity of all their cells using a daily rhythm. The second case explains an apparent contradiction that happens every time a woman gets pregnant and delivers a healthy baby--how the immune system tolerates a foreign tissue such as the fetus. The next case study in this book shows how bodies regulate the amount of fat using a complex interaction of proteins that function as a lipostat, a self-regulating fat maintenance system. Finally, the book provides an understanding of why some species live long lives while others die after very short lives, and under what conditions each situation is favored. What is evolutionarily adaptive about death? These four case studies provide sufficient evidence to understand how animals regulate many of their own metabolic functions.

Also available in print.

Mode of access: World Wide Web.

System requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.

Title from PDF title page (viewed on May 14, 2016).

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