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Cell networks / A. Malcolm Campbell, Christopher J. Paradise.

By: Campbell, A. Malcolm [author.].
Contributor(s): Paradise, Christopher J [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Biology collection: Publisher: New York, [New York] (222 East 46th Street, New York, NY 10017) : Momentum Press, 2016Description: 1 online resource (42 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781606509906.Call number: 571.6 Subject(s): Cytology | Unicellular organisms | Bacteria | symbiotic relationship | mutualistic | symbiont | bioluminescence | quorum sensing | luciferase | autoinducer | LuxI | LuxR | positive feedback loop | human microbiome | negative feedback loop | cooperativity | slime mold | signal transduction | circadian rhythm | Dropsophila | cyanobacterium | competition | covalent modulation | allosteric modulationOnline resources: Click here to access online Also available in print.
Contents:
1. Single-celled organisms communicate with one another -- Ethical, legal, social implications: ninety percent of cells in and on humans are microbial --
2. Unicellular species can work cooperatively -- Eukaryotic microbes can function collectively --
3. Bacterial cells can keep track of time --
Conclusion -- Glossary -- Index.
Abstract: It is common for most people to mistakenly think that humans are the only species that can coordinate their behavior and build structures that protect them from the environment. Students of nature will think of birds building nests, but very few people know that bacteria are able to communicate and restructure their environment in complex ways that improve their ability to survive. This book presents experimental evidence of quorum sensing, biofilm formation, self-assembly of microbes into visible and mobile creatures. This book also examines the experimental evidence showing how bacteria can keep track of time and coordinate the behavior of an entire population. Individual cells, it turns out, are capable of functioning in ways that blur the distinction between unicellular and multicellular organisms.
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ebook

Includes bibliographical references and index.

1. Single-celled organisms communicate with one another -- Ethical, legal, social implications: ninety percent of cells in and on humans are microbial --

2. Unicellular species can work cooperatively -- Eukaryotic microbes can function collectively --

3. Bacterial cells can keep track of time --

Conclusion -- Glossary -- Index.

Restricted to libraries which purchase an unrestricted PDF download via an IP.

It is common for most people to mistakenly think that humans are the only species that can coordinate their behavior and build structures that protect them from the environment. Students of nature will think of birds building nests, but very few people know that bacteria are able to communicate and restructure their environment in complex ways that improve their ability to survive. This book presents experimental evidence of quorum sensing, biofilm formation, self-assembly of microbes into visible and mobile creatures. This book also examines the experimental evidence showing how bacteria can keep track of time and coordinate the behavior of an entire population. Individual cells, it turns out, are capable of functioning in ways that blur the distinction between unicellular and multicellular organisms.

Also available in print.

Mode of access: World Wide Web.

System requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.

Title from PDF title page (viewed on May 14, 2016).

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