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Evolution and origin of cells / A. Malcolm Campbell, Christopher J. Paradise.

By: Campbell, A. Malcolm [author.].
Contributor(s): Paradise, Christopher J [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Biology collection: Publisher: New York, [New York] (222 East 46th Street, New York, NY 10017) : Momentum Press, 2016Description: 1 online resource (42 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781944749026.Call number: 571.6 Subject(s): Cytology | Cells -- Evolution | Cell organelles -- Formation | evolution | theory | natural selection | selective advantage | genetic drift | gene flow | emergent property | faith | science | proteins | nucleic acid | carbohydrates | lipids | hydrophilic | hydrophobic | cell theory | amphiphilic | vesicles | RNA-world hypothesis | ribozymes | mRNA | directed evolution | micellesOnline resources: Click here to access online Also available in print.
Contents:
1. Defining evolution -- Ethical, legal, social implications: evolution and religion are compatible --
2. Abiotic processes can generate biologically important molecules -- Self-organizing and replicating molecules --
3. Non-living vesicles can compete and grow -- Self-organizing vesicles -- Abiotic vesicle growth and reproduction --
4. Non-living vesicles can harvest and store energy --
Conclusion -- Glossary -- Index.
Abstract: It is easy to understand how cells are produced from preexisting cells. And it is possible to imagine how space dust condensed to form inanimate planets. But what stumps most people is how inanimate matter suddenly formed the first living cell. This problem has vexed scientists and philosophers over the millennia, but recent research has cracked open this black box that is the origin of life. After formally defining evolution, this book presents the modern classic experiments that show how abiotic molecules can be formed from inorganic starting materials. Once biologically important molecules such as lipids and RNA were formed, they could self-assemble into complex shapes that exhibit life-like traits such as growth, reproduction, competition and energy storage. Biologists have produced all these behaviors in non-living vesicles to the point it becomes difficult to distinguish when to know if an object is living or not. In addition, this book addresses the important question of how religion and science can coexist without one threatening the other.
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ebook

Includes bibliographical references and index.

1. Defining evolution -- Ethical, legal, social implications: evolution and religion are compatible --

2. Abiotic processes can generate biologically important molecules -- Self-organizing and replicating molecules --

3. Non-living vesicles can compete and grow -- Self-organizing vesicles -- Abiotic vesicle growth and reproduction --

4. Non-living vesicles can harvest and store energy --

Conclusion -- Glossary -- Index.

Restricted to libraries which purchase an unrestricted PDF download via an IP.

It is easy to understand how cells are produced from preexisting cells. And it is possible to imagine how space dust condensed to form inanimate planets. But what stumps most people is how inanimate matter suddenly formed the first living cell. This problem has vexed scientists and philosophers over the millennia, but recent research has cracked open this black box that is the origin of life. After formally defining evolution, this book presents the modern classic experiments that show how abiotic molecules can be formed from inorganic starting materials. Once biologically important molecules such as lipids and RNA were formed, they could self-assemble into complex shapes that exhibit life-like traits such as growth, reproduction, competition and energy storage. Biologists have produced all these behaviors in non-living vesicles to the point it becomes difficult to distinguish when to know if an object is living or not. In addition, this book addresses the important question of how religion and science can coexist without one threatening the other.

Also available in print.

Mode of access: World Wide Web.

System requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.

Title from PDF title page (viewed on May 14, 2016).

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