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Neurons and muscles / A. Malcolm Campbell, Christopher J. Paradise.

By: Campbell, A. Malcolm [author.].
Contributor(s): Paradise, Christopher J [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Biology collection: Publisher: New York, [New York] (222 East 46th Street, New York, NY 10017) : Momentum Press, 2016Description: 1 online resource (50 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781944749071.Call number: 591.188 Subject(s): Neurons | Muscle cells | Memory -- Research | allosterically modulated | transmembrane | covalent modulation | ligand-gated | ion channels | depolarized | voltage-gated | refractory period | patch clamp | myelin | nodes of Ranvier | secretory vesicles | skeletal muscle | motor neurons | acetylcholine | sarcomere | striated | longitudinal sections | cross sections | actin | myosin | troponin | tropomyosin | T-tubules | hypertrophy | hyperplasia | performance-enhancing drugs | short-term memory | long-term memory | sensory neurons | synapse | cAMP | PKA | MAPKOnline resources: Click here to access online Also available in print.
Contents:
1. Neurons receive and send information --
2. Muscles contract and grow bigger -- Ethical, legal, and social implications: use of performance enhancing drugs --
3. Memories require new proteins in neurons -- Ethical, legal, and social implications: concerns about memory research --
Conclusion -- Glossary -- Index.
Abstract: Whenever a dancer or an athlete performs amazing feats, it is the consequence of two very interesting cell types: neurons and muscles. When the two of these cell types work together, animals can move in complex ways with surprising control. Not only do they work together to produce movement, they have many traits in common. They both convert chemical signals into electrical information, and then back into chemical information again. This book will examine how neurons process information and communicate to adjacent cells. This book presents how muscle cells know when to contract and how contraction leads to bigger muscles. Finally, the last chapter presents how long-term memories are formed. In all three chapters, some of the original data that have contributed to our understanding of these two fascinating cell types are reproduced to provide supporting evidence for the function of these two cell types.
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ebook

Includes bibliographical references and index.

1. Neurons receive and send information --

2. Muscles contract and grow bigger -- Ethical, legal, and social implications: use of performance enhancing drugs --

3. Memories require new proteins in neurons -- Ethical, legal, and social implications: concerns about memory research --

Conclusion -- Glossary -- Index.

Restricted to libraries which purchase an unrestricted PDF download via an IP.

Whenever a dancer or an athlete performs amazing feats, it is the consequence of two very interesting cell types: neurons and muscles. When the two of these cell types work together, animals can move in complex ways with surprising control. Not only do they work together to produce movement, they have many traits in common. They both convert chemical signals into electrical information, and then back into chemical information again. This book will examine how neurons process information and communicate to adjacent cells. This book presents how muscle cells know when to contract and how contraction leads to bigger muscles. Finally, the last chapter presents how long-term memories are formed. In all three chapters, some of the original data that have contributed to our understanding of these two fascinating cell types are reproduced to provide supporting evidence for the function of these two cell types.

Also available in print.

Mode of access: World Wide Web.

System requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.

Title from PDF title page (viewed on May 14, 2016).

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