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Reproduction and cell division / A. Malcolm Campbell, Christopher J. Paradise.

By: Campbell, A. Malcolm [author.].
Contributor(s): Paradise, Christopher J [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Biology collection: Publisher: New York, [New York] (222 East 46th Street, New York, NY 10017) : Momentum Press, 2016Description: 1 online resource (50 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781944749149.Call number: 612.6 Subject(s): Reproduction | Cell division | Genetics | haploid | gametes | diploid | genotypes | phenotypes | meiosis | dominant traits | homozygous | heterozygous | central dogma | homologous chromosomes | progeny | alleles | Punnett square | dihybrid cross | law of independent assortment | law of segregation | random | centromere | chromatid | mitosis | spindle fibers | microtubules | prophase | metaphase | anaphase | telophase | interphase | cytokenesis | tetraploidOnline resources: Click here to access online Also available in print.
Contents:
1. Traits can disappear and reappear in a later generation -- Mendel discovers inheritance ratios -- Mendel discovers variation from ratios -- Mendel finds repeating pattern of inheritance -- Meiosis contributes to variation -- Tool for calculating probabilities --
2. Inheritance patterns for two traits simultaneously -- Mendel discovers two-trait ratios -- Mendel establishes genetic rules -- Ethical, legal, social implications: the scientific meaning of "random" --
3. Prokaryotes reproduce by binary fission --
4. Eukaryotes reproduce through mitosis and cytokinesis --
5. Gametes are formed after meiosis -- Meiosis I -- Meiosis II -- Ethical, legal, social implications: the ethics of genetic engineering humans --
Conclusion -- Glossary -- Index.
Abstract: Why do some children look more like one parent than another? How can two parents with dark hair have a child with red hair? How can two dark-skinned parents have a baby that has light skin? Everyone has wondered these questions, but in order to understand such unexpected outcomes, an understanding of what Gregor Mendel discovered--the rules of genetics--is necessary. This book reproduces Mendel's original data that Mendel used to discover how traits are passed from one generation to the next. In addition to the rules governing DNA inheritance, this book also examines how cells reproduce--all cells. Do bacterial cells reproduce the same way animal cells do? And when a person has a cut that needs to heal, do those cells reproduce the same way that sperm and egg cells are produced? How do all these cells keep track of how much DNA is needed in order to function properly? Data will be examined that explains how reproduction works for every cell on the planet.
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

1. Traits can disappear and reappear in a later generation -- Mendel discovers inheritance ratios -- Mendel discovers variation from ratios -- Mendel finds repeating pattern of inheritance -- Meiosis contributes to variation -- Tool for calculating probabilities --

2. Inheritance patterns for two traits simultaneously -- Mendel discovers two-trait ratios -- Mendel establishes genetic rules -- Ethical, legal, social implications: the scientific meaning of "random" --

3. Prokaryotes reproduce by binary fission --

4. Eukaryotes reproduce through mitosis and cytokinesis --

5. Gametes are formed after meiosis -- Meiosis I -- Meiosis II -- Ethical, legal, social implications: the ethics of genetic engineering humans --

Conclusion -- Glossary -- Index.

Restricted to libraries which purchase an unrestricted PDF download via an IP.

Why do some children look more like one parent than another? How can two parents with dark hair have a child with red hair? How can two dark-skinned parents have a baby that has light skin? Everyone has wondered these questions, but in order to understand such unexpected outcomes, an understanding of what Gregor Mendel discovered--the rules of genetics--is necessary. This book reproduces Mendel's original data that Mendel used to discover how traits are passed from one generation to the next. In addition to the rules governing DNA inheritance, this book also examines how cells reproduce--all cells. Do bacterial cells reproduce the same way animal cells do? And when a person has a cut that needs to heal, do those cells reproduce the same way that sperm and egg cells are produced? How do all these cells keep track of how much DNA is needed in order to function properly? Data will be examined that explains how reproduction works for every cell on the planet.

Also available in print.

Mode of access: World Wide Web.

System requirements: Adobe Acrobat reader.

Title from PDF title page (viewed on May 14, 2016).

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